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Considering the Future of Complete Streets

At their Tuesday, June 9 work session, the Mayor and Commission will begin the process of defining implementation strategies for ACC’s existing Complete Streets Policy. These implementation strategies will affect every corner of the county for years to come. We encourage you to attend the work session and to familiarize yourself with Complete Streets concepts.

More importantly, please write to the Mayor and Commissioners to let them know you support creative, flexible design and underlying priorities that do not give preeminence to motor vehicles.

The following letter outlines questions we believe Commissioners should raise at Tuesday’s work session.  Please use any portion of this letter in your comments to the Mayor & Commissioners. And by all means, please share this far and wide.

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BikeAthens and Complete Streets: Prince Avenue are pleased to see a Complete Streets Policy report updating the community on past and future projects. We hope this type of analysis occurs annually.  The specific projects referenced in the materials include designs championed by other Georgia cities that we are excited to see come to Athens (i.e., buffered bike lanes).  While we are, for the most part, satisfied with the projects discussed, we have some questions about the larger impact and direction of ACC’s Complete Streets Policy. Before we get to our those questions, we’ll note that a stronger, more impactful policy would apply Complete Streets principles to all projects, big or small. As the Complete Streets Coalition highlights:

“Under [the Complete Streets] approach, even small projects can be an opportunity to make meaningful improvements. In repaving projects, for example, an edge stripe can be shifted to create more room for cyclists. In routine work on traffic lights, the timing can be changed to better accommodate pedestrians walking at a slower speed. A strong Complete Streets policy will integrate Complete Streets planning into all types of projects, including new construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, repair, and maintenance.”

As currently written, the ACC Complete Streets Policy is restricted to new road construction or major rehabilitation. This limits the number of potential complete streets projects, and gives staff discretion to apply the Policy during resurfacing and re-striping. Amending the Policy so it applies to all projects would create a more reliable, transparent mechanism for identifying and adding meaningful enhancements to our transportation network. It would facilitate the Policy’s key objective: the creation of a “comprehensive, integrated, and connected transportation network.”

__________________________________________________________________

Question: Why were the 20,000 ADT limit and 10-year Level of Service projections (LOS is a measure of motor vehicle travel delay) selected by staff as the appropriate “Road Diet” criteria?

Current research indicates 20K ADT on the corridor is not the upper limit for a successful street reconfiguration.  Since 2005, more research and experience have demonstrated the efficacy of lane reconfigurations at much higher traffic counts.  Furthermore, LOS measures one metric—travel delay, for one user group—motor vehicles.  As such, it is incompatible with the goals of Complete Streets.

This from the FHWA:

• “The ADT provides a good first approximation on whether or not to consider a Road Diet conversion.” (Emphasis ours)

• “A 2011 Kentucky study showed Road Diets could work up to an ADT of 23,000 vehicles per day (vpd).35

• “Knapp, Giese, and Lee have documented Road Diets with ADTs ranging from 8,500 to 24,000 vpd.37

• “Road Diet projects have been completed on roadways with relatively high traffic volumes in urban areas or near larger cities with satisfactory results.”

The goal of reconfiguring traffic lanes is to increase safety and efficiency of the street.  Most often, there is no effect on traffic volume, and little to no effect on travel time.

A list of Complete Streets Projects

A majority of streets saw ADTs increase after the lane reconfiguration

The above chart (PDF) shows 6 projects with “before” ADTs above 20K for the corridor; and 8 projects with “after” ADTs above 20K.   The goal of a so-called “road diet” is to increase traffic among all modes! (We’ll note that “road diet” is a poor metaphor because the reconfiguration adds value to the street—more lanes equal more users.) Road reconfigurations are designed to more efficiently allocate under-utilized pavement among all street users.

Moreover, published studies of complete streets reconfigurations rarely refer to LOS, and they do not reference 10-year LOS projections.  Indeed, the ACC T & PW follow-up report (PDF) on the original Baxter St. reconfiguration does not refer to LOS, and it does not refer to a 10-year traffic projection.  Ten years after the Mayor and Commission last considered the “Road Diet” policy, it is time to incorporate it into the Complete Streets Policy and update the “road diet” criteria to better reflect current research.

Question: Because LOS is simply a measure of motor vehicle delay, is it an appropriate measure for Complete Streets? 

LOS focuses solely on motor vehicle travel time; therefore, its use in determining appropriate multi-modal treatments is at odds with Complete Streets goals and objectives.  The North American City Transportation Officials (NACTO) agree: “LOS is one of many tools that may be employed to assess traffic conditions in cities, but it should never be the only tool used” (emphasis ours). An “A” LOS is one where there are minimal delays for cars and trucks—no stopping at lights, no stopping for people crossing the street, no slowing for people on bikes.  It is mono-modal and rewards rapid vehicular movement. Increasingly, as jurisdictions adopt Complete Streets policies, they are also adopting new metrics to better quantify how streets provide safe, convenient service to all users.  Again NACTO:

• “Chicago’s Complete Streets Manual (2013) moves away from the LOS paradigm. The manual recommends using no minimum vehicle LOS and prioritizes pedestrian LOS, requiring no pedestrian delays in excess of 60 seconds.2

• “San Francisco adopted its Transportation Sustainability Program in 2002. This policy mandates the gradual elimination of LOS.”

There is a host of research devoted to creating new multi-modal service metrics. See here, here, here, here (link to PDF), here, here, here (PDF), here, and here (link to pdf).

Question: Will Transportation and Public Works be developing Complete Streets Performance Measures, akin to those currently in use for motor vehicles?

The ACC Complete Streets Policy’s goals are desirable, with a strong statement of intent.  However, we currently have no method of monitoring the progress of implementation or providing feedback on performance measures.  The FY ’16 budget for Transportation and Public Works incorporates Performance Measures (PDF), but they focus on motor vehicles: “# of Miles of Roadway striping, # of signs Replaced, # of traffic signal Upgrades.” (p. C-107)  It would be easy to include goals for # miles of sidewalk created, # of miles of bike lane striped, # of low-stress intersections created, # of pedestrian signal improvements, # crosswalks enhanced. Complete Streets Performance Measures would allow the community to engage in the visioning of ACC and track policy implementation.

Question: Is the cost of utility relocation a Complete Streets cost?

This is the second time in the last few years the cost utility relocation has been raised only after approval of a Complete Streets project (College Station Bridge Replacement). The strict criteria for allowing street reconfigurations, combined with the the costs of road widening and utility relocation, raises doubts about the ability of the Complete Streets Policy as currently written to have any meaningful impact.  Road diets are only recommended on low ADT roads (and roads with little projected growth, which means they are probably not where any one wants to be). Yet, in the absence of a complete street conversion, the only solution to create extra space for people walking, people riding bikes, and people riding the bus, is to widen the road.  In those cases, the cost of the road widening or the utility relocation will put the project in danger of exceeding the 20% cost cap.  The result is a patch-work of projects that provide no connectivity, especially failing connect people to the most popular locations. Creative, flexible design and underlying priorities that do not give preeminence to motor vehicle LOS can and should reduce road widening pre-requisites for complete street improvements.

The answers to these questions will guide the future of Complete Streets in Athens and determine if we follow the example of other Georgia cities in accommodating all modes of transportation, or continue to limit transportation choices and allow motor vehicles to clog our main streets.

-BikeAthens and Complete Streets: Prince Avenue

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BikeAthens Summer Series: Wednesday Happy Hour

Summer

BikeAthens presents the Summer Series in Celebration of the best time for riding in town

To celebrate the greatest season to live and ride in Athens, Bike Athens is excited to present a summer series of happy hours, bike-in movies, group rides, etc., culminating in a bike-camping trip in August! So grease up your chains because summer is here, and summer was made for biking

Our first Wednesday Happy Hour of the summer will be at Normal Bar this coming Wednesday, the 27th. If you want to ride over in a group, we’ll be leaving from the Tracy St. Warehouses around 5. Otherwise, just meet us there or whatever.

The happy hour series is partly intended to bring business to local bars and restaurants on their less-busy nights (Monday-Wednesday), and partly to increase the visibility of cyclists contributing to the local economy around Prince avenue and downtown, so if y’all have suggestions for bars/restaurants, throw them our way!

We’ve created a Facebook event page for the Summer Series so you can stay up-to-date on the latest events!!

 

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BikeAthens: Athens, Ga T-Shirts are here!!

You may have seen our new shirts at Twilight this weekend, now you can get yours for just $18!  We have both great colors in all sizes in Men’s and Women’s cuts! Its the perfect way to support BikeAthens and demonstrate your Athens love!

Two new shirts!!!

Now in Green!!


Color
Size



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Bike Friendly Friday: One Month Anniversary!

Right before BikeAthens left for the National Bike Summit, we started a new blog: Bike Friendly Friday.  Every Friday, we add new new post to further the discussion of how Athens can become a more bike friendly community.  If you haven’t been following the posts, here is your chance to catch up, as we run what TV would call a “clip show”

Week 1

In 2011, the League of American Bicyclists named Athens-Clarke County a bronze-level Bike Friendly Community.  The award made Athens only the third Georgia Community to receive the award.  We wrote at the time: “Athens-Clarke County was selected as a Bicycle Friendly Community at the bronze level, recognizing a strong commitment to cycling, responsive to the needs of cyclists, and with bicycle usage above average for U.S. communities. When it is time to reapply for BFC status, Athens-Clarke County will have the chance to become the first silver, gold or platinum community in Georgia.” What went unremarked is that BFC designations last only four years. 2015 is the time for ACC to reapply.

Over the next 42 weeks, we’ll be blogging here at Bike Friendly Friday to highlight the progress Athens has made in the last four years; and perhaps more importantly, begin to sketch out a road map to advance Athens to a Silver or Gold Bike Friendly Community.  So bookmark this page! As next week as we’ll update from the National Bike Summit, and place Athens bike advocacy in the context of the national movement.

Week 2

We are writing this post in the almost literal shadow of the US Capitol, as BikeAthens has just finished a week at the National Bike Summit.  Three full days of workshops, networking, learning, laughing, and oh yeah–talking with Georgia Senators and Representatives about the need to continue funding biking and walking in the next multi-modal transportation bill.  We are champing at the bit to return to Athens full of energy and new ideas for how to forward our vision of a comprehensive transportation network everyone can use with confidence and ease.

Attending the summit always exposes us to big ideas–one of the biggest this year was a panel discussion about Vision Zero.  Vision Zero is a policy and a fervent belief that all traffic fatalities are preventable–that all traffic fatalities and serious injuries can be eliminated and that no level of traffic deaths is acceptable. The Bike Summit Panel included representatives from Philadelphia, San Francisco, San Diego, and New York City; but the rapt audience proved that many cities are interested in Vision Zero Policies.

Leah Shahum, the Director of the Vision Zero Network, leads a panel discussion about Vision Zero policies around the country

 Now, one day after the Summit has ended, we are still feeling the rush from all the excitement, but as we continue to advocate for an enhanced, multi-modal transportation network; as we work to move Athens toward a Gold level Bike Friendly Community designation, you may hear us talk more about Vision Zero for Athens.

Week 3

Now that we are back from the bike summit, and back to regular hours, we’ll begin to focus these posts on Athens efforts to move up the Bike Friendly Community rankings.  In evaluating a community, the League of American Bicyclists looks at the 5 E’s: Engineering, Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, and Evaluation & planning.  Before the year is over, we’ll go through each criteria looking at the 2011 League feedback, as well as what we’ve done in the interim (for example, through a partnership with the Municipal Court, Bike Athens has taught basic bike safety to over 750 people in the last two years—Education).

In 2011, the League ID’d the “four most significant measures” Athens should take to improve the streets for those on bike.  In 2015, the four measures provide a snapshot of how far we’ve come, and where we need to go:

1. Expand efforts to evaluate the bicycle usage and crash statistics.

  • These, of course, go hand-in-hand as crash statistics do not mean much until we know how many people are riding.  Athens has counted bikes as it relates to small scale projects, but there has not been a large, official bike traffic count.  It is hard to identify streets and intersections that need critical enhancements without knowing how many people ride in Athens.  Work to be done!

2. Offer a bicycling skills class on a regular basis [emphasis theirs]

  • While it is not open to public, BikeAthens and the Municipal Court have created a Ticket Diversion course. If you get a ticket while riding your bike, you can attend a bike safety class rather than paying the fine (does not apply to all offenses)!  The number of ticket diversion programs across the country is growing, but Athens is at the forefront.  At the time the course started, it was one of only a handful of ticket diversion programs in the US.
  • We also teach a bike skills class every month at the Municipal Court.  In the 2 years, since the program’s creation, BikeAthens has taught over 750 people to ride right, ride bright!  Perhaps we have not met the emphasized regular basis, but we are making progress.

3. Fully implement the comprehensive bike plan and continue to close gaps in the network. […] Set an ambitious, attainable target to increase the percentage of trips made by bike in the city.

  • We’ll save the first part for a more in-depth discussion, but it is soon approaching the time when Athens needs a new Bike Master Plan.  While Athens has repeatedly set budgetary goals and objectives to provide sustainable, environmentally sensitive infrastructure, and multi-modal transportation—there is not set mode-share goal.  Indeed, to our knowledge, no community in Georgia has official set a mode-share goal.  So work to be done!

4. Expanding the bicycle and pedestrian manager’s time focused on these projects.

  • Athens has dedicated transportation planners and engineers but no specific bike-ped coordinator.

There’s the wide-area road map to a more “bike friendly” Athens.  We’ve improved the educational opportunities in town, but there are ways to improve the other Es.  And that’s what we’ll be talking about it the weeks ahead! Remember, every Friday is Bike Friendly Friday!!

Week 4

The Downtown Athens Master Plan Implementation Committee is running full swing–just yesterday they discussed the possibility of creating TADs (tax allocation districts).  We were surprised at the flexibility and fundraising of TADs.  Their use could bring a lot of changes to downtown, and bring a lot of benefits to all of Clarke County.  In the coming weeks, the discussion will turn to the transportation and street design items of the master plan (to save space, let’s just call it the DMP).  When discussing of the role of bikes in the downtown infrastructure, the DMP unsurprisingly notes: “Key to the continued improvement of Athens downtown vitality and quality is the evolution of a very comprehensive transportation system both as means of access to and from the downtown as well as excellent access throughout it. The enhancements must include transportation by:  A. Auto  B. Transit  C. bicycle  D. Pedestrian” (p. 59)

Hmm…Sounds familiar…


 

 

 

 

As important as bikes—well, the people who ride bikes—are to the downtown ecosystem, it is more important that there are convenient, accessible, and comfortable routes to downtown.  Incorporating our feedback, the DMP correctly reports, “[t]he input from the bicycle community has been to develop corridors to get bicyclists to and from downtown and not necessary around inside it of it where they can move with other traffic.”  In other words, with traffic calming, shared lanes can work downtown.  It is more important to facilitate trips to downtown.  The League of American Cyclists noted the lack of bike lanes on arterial streets:

 Here is what our bike map looks like if you remove all streets without bike lanes:

Need more connectivity before we have a network

Only two bike lanes reach downtown and only one extends more than a few blocks.  This is why Prince Avenue is so important.  This is why the Firefly is so important. This is why North Avenue is so important.  People will not ride downtown, until they can get downtown.  For a healthy downtown, we need healthy, complete Arterials to conveniently, and comfortably usher people to downtown Athens.

Week 5

Last week we talked about the need for Athens to better integrate bikes into arterial street design. With greater access to downtown, more people will ride downtown, and more people will be downtown.  However, our focus on better access to downtown does not mean we think downtown and the downtown master lack opportunities for improvement.  Indeed there are a couple of tweaks that would greatly improve downtown streets for everyone.

First, Athens could consider reversing the angle of parking space to make it exiting a space easy, safe, and visible.  Pulling into a downtown space is easy.  Backing out of a space is not:

Angle-In Parking

Danger, Will Robinson!

Parked cars block our view as we back into traffic. This configuration is also tricky when we’re riding: we cannot see (or make eye contact with drivers), and cars may suddenly into our path. Flipping or reversing the angle of parking solves this traffic dilemma.  Reversing the parking angle means we’d back into the space, and pull into to traffic:

Flip it and Reverse It

On this DC street, drivers can see and be seen!

With this configuration, when we exit the space, we have a full view of oncoming traffic.  When on a bike, we can now make eye contact and communicate with drivers.  Visibility is improved! Safety is improved! And it really does not change street operations. The parking movements are the same; the order is simply reversed.  Last, it’s cheap! This change can be made during street repavings at no extra cost!

Second, Athens should bring shared streets to downtown.  But wait! you say, don’t we already share the road?  Shared streets go much further than a mere sign: shared streets subtly reorganize street-space to give equal priority to people on bikes, people on foot, and people on cars.  Shared streets work by eliminating by blurring the lines between uses. Rather than pushing people to the edges of the road and placing cars in the center, shared streets allow more mixing between walkers, and riders, and drivers. Shared streets often eliminate curbs and lane lines and they post low speed limits.  While this seems like chaos, it can greatly improve street safety.  It turns out a little bit of chaos makes everyone pay a little more attention. The graphic cross section of a shared street looks fairly…pedestrian:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The aerial view of Seattle shared street better reveals how a shared streets looks and operates more like a plaza:

The aerial view looks more like a plaza or promenade, but cars are not prohibited.

The Downtown Master Plan currently calls for more sidewalk space—Pedestrian Corridors—along College and Jackson.  Why not shared-streets?  A shared street design would allow College and Jackson to act like true Promenades without closing the street to cars.  Sounds like a win all around!!

 

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Bike Friendly Friday: Truly Shared Streets

Week 5

Last week we talked about the need for Athens to better integrate bikes into arterial street design. With greater access to downtown, more people will ride downtown, and more people will be downtown.  However, our focus on better access to downtown does not mean we think downtown and the downtown master lack opportunities for improvement.  Indeed there are a couple of tweaks that would greatly improve downtown streets for everyone.

First, Athens could consider reversing the angle of parking space to make it exiting a space easy, safe, and visible.  Pulling into a downtown space is easy.  Backing out of a space is not:

Angle-In Parking

Danger, Will Robinson!

Parked cars block our view as we back into traffic. This configuration is also tricky when we’re riding: we cannot see (or make eye contact with drivers), and cars may suddenly into our path. Flipping or reversing the angle of parking solves this traffic dilemma.  Reversing the parking angle means we’d back into the space, and pull into to traffic:

Flip it and reverse it

On this DC Street, drivers can see and be seen

With this configuration, when we exit the space, we have a full view of oncoming traffic.  When on a bike, we can now make eye contact and communicate with drivers.  Visibility is improved! Safety is improved! And it really does not change street operations. The parking movements are the same; the order is simply reversed.  Last, it’s cheap! This change can be made during street repavings at no extra cost!

Second, Athens should bring shared streets to downtown.  But wait! you say, don’t we already share the road?  Shared streets go much further than a mere sign: shared streets subtly reorganize street-space to give equal priority to people on bikes, people on foot, and people on cars.  Shared streets work by eliminating by blurring the lines between uses. Rather than pushing people to the edges of the road and placing cars in the center, shared streets allow more mixing between walkers, and riders, and drivers. Shared streets often eliminate curbs and lane lines and they post low speed limits.  While this seems like chaos, it can greatly improve street safety.  It turns out a little bit of chaos makes everyone pay a little more attention. The graphic cross section of a shared street looks fairly…pedestrian:

The shared street cross section looks familiar

The aerial view of Seattle shared street better reveals how a shared streets looks and operates more like a plaza:

The aerial view looks more like a plaza or promenade, but cars are not prohibited.

The Downtown Master Plan currently calls for more sidewalk space—Pedestrian Corridors—along College and Jackson.  Why not shared-streets?  A shared street design would allow College and Jackson to act like true Promenades without closing the street to cars.  Sounds like a win all around!!

For more information on Shared Streets:

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3042421/fast-cities/street-smarts?partner=rss

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3037471/on-a-new-shared-street-in-chicago-there-are-no-sidewalks-no-lights-and-no-signs#1

http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/bell_street/boulevard_park.htm

http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2014/09/08/chicagos-first-shared-street-is-coming-soon-to-uptown.php

http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20130730/uptown/argyle-become-citys-first-with-shared-street-concept

http://www.planetizen.com/node/72620  (has a link to a good pdf of the project)

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Bike Friendly Friday: Healthy Arterials

Week 4

The Downtown Athens Master Plan Implementation Committee is running full swing–just yesterday they discussed the possibility of creating TADs (tax allocation districts).  We were surprised at the flexibility and fundraising of TADs.  Their use could bring a lot of changes to downtown, and bring a lot of benefits to all of Clarke County.  In the coming weeks, the discussion will turn to the transportation and street design items of the master plan (to save space, let’s just call it the DMP).  When discussing of the role of bikes in the downtown infrastructure, the DMP unsurprisingly notes: “Key to the continued improvement of Athens downtown vitality and quality is the evolution of a very comprehensive transportation system both as means of access to and from the downtown as well as excellent access throughout it. The enhancements must include transportation by:  A. Auto  B. Transit  C. bicycle  D. Pedestrian” (p. 59)

Hmm…Sounds familiar…

 

As important as bikes—well, the people who ride bikes—are to the downtown ecosystem, it is more important that there are convenient, accessible, and comfortable routes to downtown.  Incorporating our feedback, the DMP correctly reports, “[t]he input from the bicycle community has been to develop corridors to get bicyclists to and from downtown and not necessary around inside it of it where they can move with other traffic.”  In other words, with traffic calming, shared lanes can work downtown.  It is more important to facilitate trips to downtown.  The League of American Cyclists noted the lack of bike lanes on arterial streets:

Here is what our bike map looks like if you remove all streets without bike lanes:

We need more connectivity before we have a network

Only two bike lanes reach downtown and only one extends more than a few blocks.  This is why Prince Avenue is so important.  This is why the Firefly is so important. This is why North Avenue is so important.  People will not ride downtown, until they can get downtown.  For a healthy downtown, we need healthy, complete Arterials to conveniently, and comfortably usher people to downtown Athens.

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Bike Friendly Friday: The Big Four

Week 3

Now that we are back from the bike summit, and back to regular hours, we’ll begin to focus these posts on Athens efforts to move up the Bike Friendly Community rankings.  In evaluating a community, the League of American Bicyclists looks at the 5 E’s: Engineering, Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, and Evaluation & planning.  Before the year is over, we’ll go through each criteria looking at the 2011 League feedback, as well as what we’ve done in the interim (for example, through a partnership with the Municipal Court, Bike Athens has taught basic bike safety to over 750 people in the last two years—Education [check]).

In 2011, the League ID’d the “four most significant measures” Athens should take to improve the streets for those on bike.  In 2015, the four measures provide a snapshot of how far we’ve come, and where we need to go:

1. Expand efforts to evaluate the bicycle usage and crash statistics.

  • These, of course, go hand-in-hand as crash statistics do not mean much until we know how many people are riding.  Athens has counted bikes as it relates to small scale projects, but there has not been a large, official bike traffic count.  It is hard to identify streets and intersections that need critical enhancements without knowing how many people ride in Athens.  Work to be done!

2. Offer a bicycling skills class on a regular basis [emphasis theirs]

  • While it is not open to public, BikeAthens and the Municipal Court have created a Ticket Diversion course. If you get a ticket while riding your bike, you can attend a bike safety class rather than paying the fine (does not apply to all offenses)!  The number of ticket diversion programs across the country is growing, but Athens is at the forefront.  At the time the course started, it was one of only a handful of ticket diversion programs in the US.
  • We also teach a bike skills class every month at the Municipal Court.  In the 2 years, since the program’s creation, BikeAthens has taught over 750 people to ride right, ride bright!  Perhaps we have not met the emphasized regular basis, but we are making progress.

3. Fully implement the comprehensive bike plan and continue to close gaps in the network. […] Set an ambitious, attainable target to increase the percentage of trips made by bike in the city.

  • We’ll save the first part for a more in-depth discussion, but it is soon approaching the time when Athens needs a new Bike Master Plan.  While Athens has repeatedly set budgetary goals and objectives to provide sustainable, environmentally sensitive infrastructure, and multi-modal transportation—there is not set mode-share goal.  Indeed, to our knowledge, no community in Georgia has official set a mode-share goal.  So work to be done!

4. Expanding the bicycle and pedestrian manager’s time focused on these projects.

  • Athens has dedicated transportation planners and engineers but no specific bike-ped coordinator.

There’s the wide-area road map to a more “bike friendly” Athens.  We’ve improved the educational opportunities in town, but there are ways to improve the other Es.  And that’s what we’ll be talking about it the weeks ahead! Remember, every Friday is Bike Friendly Friday!!

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Bishop Park Preliminary Master Plan Input

Our friends at Leisure Services have finished preliminary plans for Bishop Park, and they are looking for additional input! The Master Plan creates more access for those walking to the park, as well as increased exercise opportunities through a walking trail that circumnavigates the park!

See the plans and take a survey here: http://athensclarkecounty.com/6213/Bishop-Park-Master-Plan

There will also be two public input sessions:
Bishop Park Master Plan Public Input Session
Wed., March 25
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Bishop Park Conference Room

Information Booth at Athens Farmers’ Market
Sat., April 4
8:00 a.m. – Noon
Bishop Park Basketball Courts

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Call for Volunteers!

Looking for a way to support the Firefly Trail this weekend? Firefly, Inc. Ticket to Ride is looking for a few goods folks to work the SAG stops in Winterville and Crawford. At Winterville—right down the block—they are looking for a couple of volunteers to help with set-up and then a few to help serve riders throughout the day. In Crawford, Firefly Inc. only needs an “adult” to work with kids from Oglethorpe High from 11:30-1:30, 1:30-3:30PM (two separate shifts). If you’re not riding, sign up directly here: http://vols.pt/p5Qxeu or email Mary Cook (maryc@fireflytrail.com) and she’ll get you sorted!

Thanks for supporting local trails!

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Bike Friendly Friday–Live from the Capitol!

Week 2

We are writing this post in the almost literal shadow of the US Capitol, as BikeAthens has just finished a week at the National Bike Summit.  Three full days of workshops, networking, learning, laughing, and oh yeah–talking with Georgia Senators and Representatives about the need to continue funding biking and walking in the next multi-modal transportation bill.  We are champing at the bit to return to Athens full of energy and new ideas for how to forward our vision of a comprehensive transportation network everyone can use with confidence and ease.

Attending the summit always exposes us to big ideas–one of the biggest this year was a panel discussion about Vision Zero.  Vision Zero is a policy and a fervent belief that all traffic fatalities are preventable–that all traffic fatalities and serious injuries can be eliminated and that no level of traffic deaths is acceptable. The Bike Summit Panel included representatives from Philadelphia, San Francisco, Sand Diego, and New York City; but the rapt audience proved that many cities are interested in Vision Zero Policies.

Leah Shahum, the Director of the Vision Zero Network, leads a panel discussion about Vision Zero policies around the country

Now, one day after the Summit has ended, we are still feeling the rush from all the excitement, but as we continue to advocate for a enhanced, multi-modal transportation network; as we work to move Athens toward a Gold level Bike Friendly Community designation, you may hear us talk more about Vision Zero for Athens.

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